Invertebrates classification for kids

Classification of animals for children

As with other animals, in the classification of invertebrates there are no absolute results, however, there is some consensus that the main groups of invertebrates can be classified into the following phyla:

They are dorsoventrally flattened animals, with oral and genital openings and primitive or simple nervous and sensory systems. They lack respiratory and circulatory systems and are divided into four classes:

They are characterized by being mainly marine and there are few freshwater species. There are two types of forms in these individuals: polyps and jellyfish. They have a chitinous, calcareous or proteinaceous exoskeleton or endoskeleton, with asexual or sexual reproduction and lack respiratory and excretory systems. A characteristic feature of the group is the presence of stinging cells that they use for defense or attack of prey.the phylum has been divided into four classes:

To this group belong the sponges, whose main characteristic is that their bodies have a large number of pores and a system of internal canals that filter food. They are sessile and depend to a great extent on water circulating through them to obtain food and oxygen. They lack true tissue and therefore organs. They are exclusively aquatic, mainly marine, although there are some species that inhabit fresh waters. Another fundamental feature is that they are made of calcium carbonate or silica and collagen, and are divided into the following classes:

Invertebrate and vertebrate animals

As with other animals, in the classification of invertebrates there are no absolute results, however, there is some consensus that the main groups of invertebrates can be classified into the following phyla:

They are dorsoventrally flattened animals, with oral and genital openings and primitive or simple nervous and sensory systems. They lack respiratory and circulatory systems and are divided into four classes:

They are characterized by being mainly marine and there are few freshwater species. There are two types of forms in these individuals: polyps and jellyfish. They have a chitinous, calcareous or proteinaceous exoskeleton or endoskeleton, with asexual or sexual reproduction and lack respiratory and excretory systems. A characteristic feature of the group is the presence of stinging cells that they use for defense or attack of prey.the phylum has been divided into four classes:

To this group belong the sponges, whose main characteristic is that their bodies have a large number of pores and a system of internal canals that filter food. They are sessile and depend to a great extent on water circulating through them to obtain food and oxygen. They lack true tissue and therefore organs. They are exclusively aquatic, mainly marine, although there are some species that inhabit fresh waters. Another fundamental feature is that they are made of calcium carbonate or silica and collagen, and are divided into the following classes:

10 invertebrate animals

Invertebrates (Latin: invertebrata) are all those animals that do not fall within the subphylum Vertebrata of the phylum Chordata. The name alludes to the fact that they lack a vertebral column.[1] The term is applicable to 95% of all animal species.[2] Today, research on invertebrates is still in progress.

Today, research on invertebrates has led to the discovery of several hundred species of great scientific, industrial, economic or even food potential, and modern medicine owes a great deal to unexpected animals such as the horseshoe crab, jellyfish and plankton.[3] Insects remain the best known group of invertebrates.

Invertebrates do not form a monophyletic group: this notion has been abandoned by recent classifications (phylogenetic classifications). However, the term «invertebrate» remains to designate a group of living beings that share the characteristic of not having a backbone.

In the language of aquatic ecology, the term «macroinvertebrate» is traditionally used to refer to freshwater invertebrates, including insects (especially larvae and nymphs), crustaceans, annelids, mollusks (aquatic snails and bivalves) and planarians (flatworms) inhabiting riverbeds, ponds, lakes, etc. Historically, their abundance and diversity have been used as indicators (bioindicators) of ecosystem health and local biodiversity. They are an essential component in the food chain and the transformation of organic matter.

Invertebrate animals

In this dossier on invertebrate animals you can find diagrams, activity sheets, summary and extension to work this didactic unit in the second cycle of primary education. All these documents can be downloaded, including the summary and the extension of the topic. At the end I have also inserted some works of this didactic unit that have been made spontaneously by the students themselves.

– Insects: Body divided into head, thorax and abdomen. Two antennae on the head. Six legs on the thorax. They are terrestrial. They are oviparous. They have metamorphosis. Examples: fly, bee, dragonfly, butterfly.

– Each time a bumblebee returns to its honeycomb loaded with nectar from the flowers, the process of honey production is repeated. To do this, the bumble bee again draws the nectar out of its mouth. The water in the nectar evaporates and the insect’s saliva causes the honey to form, which is deposited in the honeycomb’s wax cells, where it is stored.

– These invertebrate animals are social insects. They live in colonies formed by thousands of members that work as a team to ensure the survival of the community. Three types of ants live in an anthill: one or more queens, males and many workers.

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