charles ii of navarreking

(Pamplona, ca. 1386 – Santa María de Nieva, Segovia, 1441) Queen of Navarre and Countess of Nemours, belonging to the House of Evreux. Daughter of the kings of Navarre Charles III the Noble and Leonor of Trastámara, in 1402 she married Martin the Younger, king of Sicily. She ruled the kingdom in her husband’s absence (1405) and upon his death remained as lieutenant between 1409 and 1414. Substituted in the position by Juan, son of Fernando I of Aragon, she returned to Navarre in 1415.

In 1420 she married in second marriage to the future Juan II of Aragon (1419), who thus became monarch consort and acquired for his children, in case of widowhood, the right to the throne of Navarre. On the death of Charles III the Noble (1425), Blanca I was proclaimed Queen of Navarre in Olite. During her reign, the queen’s abulia allowed Navarre to be subjected in everything to the Aragonese king and his interests, losing border territories as a result of the armed intervention of Juan II of Aragon in the affairs of Castile (1428-29).

wikipedia

Blanca I of Navarre (Pamplona, 1385[1] – Santa María la Real de Nieva, April 3, 1441), belonging to the Évreux dynasty, was queen consort of Sicily between 1401-1409, and proprietary queen of Navarre from 1425 until her death.

In 1405 Martin the Younger temporarily left Sicily to return to Aragon; shortly before, on October 22, 1404, Blanche was named «vicar» (regent) of the kingdom by her husband during his absence. Despite her youth, the queen, with the help of the Royal Council, ruled in fact and not only in name. During her first regency, Blanca had to face a conspiracy in Messina that was unsuccessful thanks to the joint action of Joan Cruilles, former bailiff of the city and the wealth contributed by Tomás de Diana, brother of the prior of the Order of St. John of Jerusalem.[8] With the return of the king to Sicily in August 1405, Blanca’s participation in the government was terminated.

The death of her husband did not interrupt Blanca’s regency, since her husband, in the will signed the same day of his death, stipulated that she should maintain her position. King Martin I the Humane of Aragon, now king of Sicily as his son’s successor, followed his wishes and confirmed his daughter-in-law as Vicar on August 7, 1409.[8] The king’s will was signed on August 7, 1409.

wikipedia

Blanca I of Navarre (Pamplona, 1385[1] – Santa María la Real de Nieva, April 3, 1441), belonging to the Évreux dynasty, was queen consort of Sicily between 1401-1409, and proprietary queen of Navarre from 1425 until her death.

In 1405 Martin the Younger temporarily left Sicily to return to Aragon; shortly before, on October 22, 1404, Blanche was named «vicar» (regent) of the kingdom by her husband during his absence. Despite her youth, the queen, with the help of the Royal Council, ruled in fact and not only in name. During her first regency, Blanca had to face a conspiracy in Messina that was unsuccessful thanks to the joint action of Joan Cruilles, former bailiff of the city and the wealth contributed by Tomás de Diana, brother of the prior of the Order of St. John of Jerusalem.[8] With the return of the king to Sicily in August 1405, Blanca’s participation in the government was terminated.

The death of her husband did not interrupt Blanca’s regency, since her husband, in the will signed the same day of his death, stipulated that she should maintain her position. King Martin I the Humane of Aragon, now king of Sicily as his son’s successor, followed his wishes and confirmed his daughter-in-law as Vicar on August 7, 1409.[8] The king’s will was signed on August 7, 1409.

john ii of aragon and i of sicily king of navarre

Blanca I of Navarre (Pamplona, 1385[1] – Santa María la Real de Nieva, April 3, 1441), belonging to the Évreux dynasty, was queen consort of Sicily between 1401-1409, and queen proprietor of Navarre from 1425 until her death.

In 1405 Martin the Younger temporarily left Sicily to return to Aragon; shortly before, on October 22, 1404, Blanche was named «vicar» (regent) of the kingdom by her husband during his absence. Despite her youth, the queen, with the help of the Royal Council, ruled in fact and not only in name. During her first regency, Blanca had to face a conspiracy in Messina that was unsuccessful thanks to the joint action of Joan Cruilles, former bailiff of the city and the wealth contributed by Tomás de Diana, brother of the prior of the Order of St. John of Jerusalem.[8] With the return of the king to Sicily in August 1405, Blanca’s participation in the government was terminated.

The death of her husband did not interrupt Blanca’s regency, since her husband, in the will signed the same day of his death, stipulated that she should maintain her position. King Martin I the Humane of Aragon, now king of Sicily as his son’s successor, followed his wishes and confirmed his daughter-in-law as Vicar on August 7, 1409.[8] The king’s will was signed on August 7, 1409.

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